hip hop

Memorial spotlights the man behind Nipsey Hussle rap persona . S.I.P

Memorial spotlights the man behind Nipsey Hussle rap persona

By JONATHAN LANDRUM Jr.today

People watch as a hearse carrying the casket of slain rapper Nipsey Hussle passes Hussle's clothing store The Marathon, Thursday, April 11, 2019, in Los Angeles. Hussle’s casket, draped in the flag of his father’s native country, Eritrea in East Africa, embarked on a 25-mile tour of the city after his memorial service, drawing thousands to the streets to catch a glimpse of the recently-anointed hometown hero. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Thousands flocked to remember the life of Nipsey Hussle at a packed memorial service Thursday that provided mourners with a deeper appreciation of Ermias Asghedom, the man behind the up-and-coming hip-hop persona.

Some of people who knew Hussle best, from his actress-fiancée Lauren London, dear friend Snoop Dogg and his mother shared their most personal stories about the rapper during the three-hour service held in Los Angeles’ Staples Center. The 21,000 seat venue hosted its first celebrity funeral since Michael Jackson’s in 2009, ending with a montage of videos of the rapper set to his song, “Dedication.”

Hussle’s casket, draped in the flag of his father’s native country, Eritrea in East Africa, then embarked on a 25-mile tour of the city, drawing thousands to the streets to catch a glimpse of the recently-anointed hometown hero.

Police kept an eye on the crowd, which appeared largely peaceful. At one point, people sat atop a police car spray-painted with the words: “Nips in Paradise.”

A shooting killed one person and wounded three others a few blocks from where the procession had passed by. But a police spokesman, Officer Drake Madison, said there was no indication it was connected to the event. South Los Angeles has seen an increase in shootings that began before Hussle’s slaying.

London shared a text message sent she sent the rapper in January calling him “my turn up and my church.” She spoke about learning so much from being in his presence as her provider and protector, but turned sad at the thought of their son being unable to remember his dad.

“My pain is for my two-year-old,” she said.

After the service, she revealed a fresh tattoo of Hussle on her forearm, writing in an Instagram post that “Real Love Never Dies” and that from now on “When you see me, you will always see him.”

Hussle’s mother, Angelique Smith, spoke calmly about her being in “perfect peace” and “happy and complete” despite her son’s death. She declared: “Ermias was a legacy.”

She called him a “superhero” who wasn’t afraid to lead, recounting a story about Ermias at 9-years-old running down the middle of the street to flag down a firetruck to extinguish her car’s engine that went under flames. Miraculously, the car still ran.

“We’re burning but not destroyed,” Smith said.

Snoop Dogg talked candidly about Hussle being a visionary and meeting him for the first time.

“Most rappers when they push up on Snoop Dogg with a mixtape, this is their line: ‘Ahh, dawg, listen to my music. I can make you a million dollars,’” Dogg said. “Nipsey’s line was, ‘Hey homie, listen to my music. Just give it a listen.’ That’s it? No record deal? You don’t want to get put on? So to me, he had vision to know and understand that I don’t want to be handed out nothing. I’m going to come and get mine.”

Hussle was shot to death March 31 while standing outside The Marathon, his South Los Angeles clothing store, not far from where the rapper grew up.

Eric R. Holder Jr., who has been charged with killing Hussle, has pleaded not guilty. Police have said Holder and Hussle had several interactions the day of the shooting and have described it as being the result of a personal dispute.

At least one of the rapper’s wishes came true Thursday. In his 2016 song “Ocean Views,” he rapped about having a Stevie Wonder song played at his funeral. The legendary singer took the stage to perform “Rocket Song,” one of Hussle’s favorites.

Earlier in the ceremony, a montage of photos featuring the rapper from infancy, childhood and adulthood, with fellow rappers, his family and London, were shown to the crowd, set to Frank Sinatra’s “My Way.”

Hussle’s children also appeared onstage to pay tribute. London’s son with rapper Lil Wayne, Cameron Carter, said days after Hussle died, he had a dream in which he saw the rapper.

“I realized Ermias told me what heaven was like. He told me it was paradise,” Cameron said.

Cameron then told the audience that Hussle would look at him through the window at times and say “respect.” Cameron then asked the crowd to say “respect” in unison, and the crowd sent the word booming through the arena.

For a decade, Hussle released much sought-after mixtapes that he sold out of the trunk of his car, helping him create a buzz and gain respect from rap purists and his peers. He said his stage name, a play on the 1960s and ’70s rhyming standup comic Nipsey Russell, was given to him as a teen by an older friend because he was such a go-getter — always hustling.

He charged $100 for his 2013 mixtape “Crenshaw,” scoring a cash and publicity coup when Jay-Z bought 100 copies for $10,000.

Last year, Hussle hit new heights with “Victory Lap,” his critically acclaimed major-label debut album on Atlantic Records that made several critics’ best-of lists. The album debuted at No. 4 on Billboard’s 200 albums charts and earned him a Grammy nomination.

But the rapper was also a beloved figure for his philanthropic work that went well beyond the usual celebrity “giving back” ethos. Following his death, political and community leaders were quick and effusive in their praise.

Hussle recently purchased the strip mall where The Marathon is located and planned to redevelop it, part of Hussle’s broader ambitions to remake the neighborhood where he grew up and attempt to break the cycle of gang life that lured him in when he was younger.

His family and friends vowed to continue his work, and London told the crowd: “The marathon continues!”

Hussle’s brother, Samiel Asghedom, also breathed life into motto. He talked about how Hussle would assemble parts to build his first computer, but became emotional about his brother leaving his “heart and soul” on the popular intersection of Crenshaw and Slauson Avenue.

“Bro, you made the world proud,” he said.

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Follow AP Entertainment Writer Jonathan Landrum Jr. on Twitter: http://twitter.com/MrLandrum31

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Meet David Lewis Hollins Jr “YahPasion” Add Ventures Music Member

Today we’d like to introduce you to David Lewis Hollins Jr.

David L Hollins Jr (born April 26, 1989), better known by his stage name YahPasion is an American independent hip hop artist. He is under a distribution deal with AddVentures Music. He was born in Phoenix, Arizona. He started writing at seven years old and began recording with his cousin at the age of 12.

After spending years recording with a group of other various artists, he decided to pursue a solo career. From there, he started his own brand (KrowVillageEnt) to perform under. He was always motivated by all music. Widely considered to be an experimental artist, new listeners should be ready to experience a different vibe, with every listen.

We’re always bombarded by how great it is to pursue your passion, etc. – but we’ve spoken with enough people to know that it’s not always easy. Overall, would you say things have been easy for you?
It’s been smooth for the most part struggling is what makes the music I make better I just convert the struggle and pain into poem form, so it works out for me.

So, as you know, we’re impressed with YahPasion – tell our readers more, for example, what you’re most proud of as a company and what sets you apart from others.
I am an Arizona hip hop artist I’m distributed through Chris Gotti '‘Addventures Music'‘ Distribution Company. I’m outside of the box type artist I think different then the way most artists think sonically different for me art should be unique to you its like a fingerprint.

Any predictions for the industry over the next few years?
Yah willing I’m alive I see myself changing the world as much as possible, I see it like this every artist is a prophet you will be sent to the people that your message is supposed to reach and that will be your tribe so to speak, so for the people I’m here to reach my music will change their way of thinking on another frequency I also have my own shoe company coming out soon look out for that I’m just working hard to change my life and everyone around me.

Image Credit:
Nia Starz

Getting in touch: VoyagePhoenix is built on recommendations from the community; it’s how we uncover hidden gems, so if you know someone who deserves recognition please let us know here.

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Lawyer: Rapper 21 Savage granted immigration bond

In an emailed statement, lawyers Kuck, Dina LaPolt and Alex Spiro said they’ve been speaking with ICE since his arrest to “clarify his actual legal standing, his eligibility for bond, and provide evidence of his extraordinary contributions to his community and society.”

They said they received notification in the previous 24 hours, “in the wake of the Grammy Awards at which he was scheduled to attend and perform,” that he was granted an expedited hearing. The Grammy Awards ceremony was held Sunday.

Abraham-Joseph was nominated for two awards at the Grammys, including record of the year for “Rockstar” alongside Post Malone. His second solo album “I Am I Was,” released in December, debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard 200 albums chart.

After his arrest, ICE said Abraham-Joseph entered the U.S. legally in July 2005, when he was 12, but has remained in the country illegally since his visa expired in July 2006. He was convicted on felony drug charges in October 2014 in Fulton County, Georgia, ICE said. He was placed in deportation proceedings in federal immigration court.

Abraham-Joseph’s lawyers disputed that. They said last week that Abraham-Joseph came to the U.S. when he was 7 and remained in the country until June 2005, when he went to visit the United Kingdom for a month. He returned on a valid visa on July 22, 2005, they said.

“Mr. Abraham-Joseph has been continuously physically present in the United States for almost 20 years, except for a brief visit abroad,” his lawyers said. “Unfortunately, in 2006 Mr. Abraham-Joseph lost his legal status through no fault of his own.”

Federal immigration officials have known Abraham-Joseph’s status since at least 2017, when he applied for a new visa. That application is pending, his attorneys said.

The attorneys also said ICE was incorrect that Abraham-Joseph has a felony conviction on his record. Fulton County prosecutors said they could not provide information on that case because it is sealed.

Abraham-Joseph’s lawyers said Tuesday that he asked them to send a message to his supporters.

″(H)e says that while he wasn’t present at the Grammy Awards, he was there in spirit and is grateful for the support from around the world and is more than ever, ready to be with his loved ones and continue making music that brings people together,” they said.

He added that he “will not forget this ordeal or any of the other fathers, sons, family members, and faceless people, he was locked up with or that remain unjustly incarcerated across the country. And he asks for your hearts and minds to be with them.”

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Copy of 21 Savage’s English origins stun fans of the Atlanta rapper

21 Savage’s English origins stun fans of the Atlanta rapper

By ANDREW DALTON 35 minutes ago

FILE - In this Sunday, May 20, 2018, file photo, 21 Savage arrives at the Billboard Music Awards at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas. It was a shock for fans when 21 Savage was taken into custody Sunday, Feb. 3, 2019, by U.S. immigration agents in Georgia. It was an even bigger shock to learn he had been an immigrant in the first place. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP, File)

LOS ANGELES (AP) — It was a shock for fans when 21 Savage was taken into custody by U.S. immigration agents in Georgia. It was an even bigger shock to learn he had been an immigrant in the first place.

The Grammy-nominated rapper and his music are so deeply associated with Atlanta that the notion he was actually born in England and brought to the U.S. as a child felt downright bizarre.

Scores of surprised tweets came after his Sunday arrest. Memes bloomed that some called cruel under the circumstances, including one of him dressed as a Buckingham Palace guard, along with an old video of him talking in a mock English accent about tea and crumpets. While the United Kingdom is responsible for rap icon Slick Rick, he also grew up in America, and its rappers traditionally have not had much success in America.

“It seems so outlandish that the prototypical Atlanta rapper is not from Atlanta,” said Samuel Hine, a writer and editor at GQ who researched 21 Savage and spent a day with him for a profile in the magazine last year. “I think that’s why so many people were sort of making fun of him, and making memes.”

By all accounts, few knew his real birthplace, and it certainly wasn’t publicly known. His accent gave no indication, and his birth name, She’yaa Bin Abraham-Joseph, could come from any number of birthplaces.

“I certainly heard no whispers challenging his accepted backstory,” Hine said.

Abraham-Joseph was detained in a targeted operation in the Atlanta area and put in deportation proceedings, U.S. Customs and Immigration Enforcement spokesman Bryan Cox said.

Abraham-Joseph’s attorneys said U.S. immigration officials have known his status at least since 2017, when he applied for a new visa. That application is pending, and his attorneys say he should be freed while it’s pending.

Both sides agree that Abraham-Joseph has not had legal status since his family’s visas expired in 2006. ICE alleges that Abraham-Joseph came to the U.S. in 2005 at age 12 while Abraham-Joseph’s attorneys say he began living here at age 7, and the 2005 arrival was from a monthlong visit to England.

“Mr. Abraham-Joseph has been continuously physically present in the United States for almost 20 years, except for a brief visit abroad,” Kuck Baxter Immigration, the law firm representing Abraham-Joseph, said in a statement Tuesday. “Unfortunately, in 2006 Mr. Abraham-Joseph lost his legal status through no fault of his own.”

The attorneys also said Tuesday that ICE was incorrect that Abraham-Joseph has a felony conviction on his record. Fulton County prosecutors said they could not provide information on that case because it is sealed.

ICE spokesman Bryan Cox declined further comment Tuesday.

Abraham-Joseph spent his teenage years in Atlanta — the city that birthed rap gods OutKast — and his image and later his music became defined by the city’s distinctive and rich hip-hop culture. Even the “21” in his name is a reference to the block where he lived there.

“Him growing up in Atlanta is a pretty fundamental part of his story,” Hine said. “His identity is so rooted in his Atlanta sound, his Atlanta crew.”

Abraham-Joseph was truthful when he rapped about his youthful exploits in Atlanta, including run-ins with the law over guns and drugs, Hine said. He just left out the stuff that came before that.

A pair of mixtapes in 2015 made his star rise quickly in the Atlanta underground. Collaborations with Atlanta artists including Metro Boomin and Offset of rap group Migos raised his profile.

He signed with Epic Records and made a pair of successful albums. His latest, “I Am I Was,” debuted at the top of the Billboard top 200 album charts this past December.

He collaborated with Drake, Cardi B, and Post Malone, whose song with 21 Savage, “Rockstar,” is nominated for two Grammys at Sunday’s awards ceremony in Los Angeles.

For many who love 21 Savage, surprise about his arrest quickly gave way to outrage.

Offset tweeted that he was “PRAYING FOR MY DAWG. ALL THE MEMES ... AINT FUNNY HIS FAMILY DEPENDING ON HIM.”

Rapper Vince Staples joined many others in tweeting, “Free 21!”

Black Lives Matter co-founder Patrisse Cullors established an online petition to stop his deportation that was fast gaining signatories.

Singer Demi Lovato felt some of the anger when she tweeted Sunday that “21 savage memes have been my favorite part of the Super Bowl.” She later clarified that she wasn’t laughing “at anyone getting deported,” but subsequently deleted her Twitter account.

While it’s not clear if it had anything to do with his own status, Abraham-Joseph did just recently address the subject of immigration and detention. Last week on the “Tonight Show,” he added a verse to his song “A Lot: that include the line, “been through some things, but I couldn’t imagine my kids stuck at the border.”

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This version corrects spelling of the GQ writer and editor’s last name to Hine, not Hines. It also updates the spelling of the rapper’s first name to She’yaa, instead of Sha Yaa, per new information from attorneys.

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Associated Press Writer Kate Brumback in Atlanta contributed.

https://apnews.com/b716895b94e547798433c48c7b836a4a

Chris Gotti talks Murder Inc, Add Ventures Music, Advice for Young Entrepreneurs & more | Chatting w| d

Chris Gotti is a self-made entrepreneur who has spearheaded the music industry and created new paths for up and coming artists. During this interview, he spoke about his history in the entertainment industry, Murder Inc, his business Add Ventures Music, tips for young entrepreneurs & much more! With over 30 years of experience in the entertainment industry, Chris Gotti has a tremendous amount of knowledge to share. Anyone who's looking to get into entrepreneurship, producing or wants to be an artist tune in! Please subscribe share with family, friends & enjoy! * * * * * Edited & Directed by: Eddie Harris Music by: Devin Harris Hair by: Delisa Harris Styled by: Daezha Deloatch

Copy of Black Superman from the Icon

Avm Members Charting Online


the radio charting for The Icon - Black Superman - it is a track from the Q Man 1991 Album being released today

First two weeks it was #144 and this week is #127 on the Global Independent radio charts. 

Debuted #42, then went to #28, and now #21 on the the National Hip Hop and R&B radio charts. This is a exciting time! 

Note - Krista Starr is traveling overseas for some show opportunities - send good wishes for us. "Congrats on your international tour dates"

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